Atrial fibrillation (AFib)


Catheter Ablation Could Potentially Save $1,725 Per Hospitalization in Paroxysmal AFib Without Complications

No Image

By: James Pitt  Oct. 08, 2018

Atrial fibrillation, the most common arrhythmia, is a condition in which the heart's upper chambers contract rapidly and irregularly. Twenty years ago, Haïssaguerre et. al discovered that pulmonary veins can spontaneously trigger AFib, and isolating pulmonary veins from each other with radiofrequency catheter ablation can correct it.

Read more

Pericardial Reconstruction May Help Control Atrial Fibrillation after Coronary Bypass

No Image

By: James Pitt  Aug. 09, 2018

Atrial fibrillation (Afib) is a major risk of coronary bypass surgery (CABG). Incidence estimates vary greatly depending on study methodology, from 5 to 40% of patients. Among 49,264 patients who underwent CABG from 2001-2012 in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database, 19% had new-onset atrial fibrillation.

Read more

Atrial Fibrillation Increases Average Length of Stay by Half a Day Among Patients with Diabetes with Complications at Selected Indiana Hospitals

No Image

By: James Pitt  Jun. 29, 2018

Atrial fibrillation (Afib) is an irregular heartbeat that has a major impact on quality of life and increases the risk of stroke or heart failure. A May 2018 meta-analysis found that diabetes raises the risk of atrial fibrillation by 28%.

Read more

Atrial Fibrillation Predicts Longer Length of Stay Among Coronary Bypass Patients in Nevada

No Image

By: James Pitt  May. 15, 2018

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a type of heart arrhythmia common in patients over 40. A 2016 study in Journal of Internal Medicine found that “the estimated lifetime risk of developing AF is one in four for men and women aged 40 years and above. Projected data from multiple population-based studies in the USA and Europe predict a two- to threefold increase in the number of AF patients by 2060.” Dexur has previously examined how AF affects readmission rates in patients with comorbid respiratory conditions.

Read more

Eliquis Has Potential in Impacting Readmission Rates of Pulmonology Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

No Image

By: Saparja Nag  Apr. 26, 2018

Eliquis (apixaban) is primarily prescribed to patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation to reduce risk of stroke, as well as to prevent deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolisms. Although AFib can occur for a number of different reasons, AFib and reduced pulmonary function are often comorbid. One study from 2009 offered three explanations for the relationship between these two conditions, given below.

Read more

Eliquis Could Impact In-Hospital Mortality Rates of Renal Failure Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

No Image

By: Saparja Nag  Apr. 17, 2018

Eliquis, an oral anticoagulant developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb, is targeted at reducing patients’ risk of stroke or systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, in addition to preventing and treating DVT (deep vein thrombosis) and PE (pulmonary embolism) in high-risk patients. The link between atrial fibrillation and conditions of the kidney has been examined in numerous clinical studies but the exact impact of anticoagulants on renal failure patients’ risk of bleeding has yet to be empirically understood in clinical trials.

Read more

Bristol-Myers Squibb’s Eliquis Could Impact Heart Failure and Cardiac Arrhythmia Patients Readmitted with Atrial Fibrillation at Cedars-Sinai

No Image

By: Saparja Nag  Mar. 20, 2018

Eliquis, produced by Bristol-Myers Squibb, was approved by the FDA in early 2013 to treat patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation in order to reduce their risk of stroke and systemic embolism. Dexur analysts were able to identify key patient populations by condition that had a significant proportion of AFib (atrial fibrillation) readmissions out of all readmissions at Cedars-Sinai. These patients that are readmitted with AFib within 30 days of an index hospital visit, that may or may have been related to AFib may benefit a great deal from Eliquis.

Read more

Atrial Fibrillation Studies at Stanford University in Medicare Patients Provide Clues to Future Cardiovascular Hospitalizations

By: Saparja Nag  Nov. 07, 2017

Atrial fibrillation (AFib)  is a common condition among Medicare patients, which is characterized by an abnormal beating pattern of the heart’s atria. It is the most common heart arrhythmia, affecting 9% of people ages 65 and older. Certain cardiovascular conditions, like high blood pressure and heart failure, can increase the likelihood of developing AFib as patients age. AFib also increases the risk for stroke and bleeding in patients, however the development of pharmaceuticals have mediated such risk factors.1

Read more