Hyponatremia


In Southern Arizona Hospitals, DRG 640 Hyponatremia Rate Exceeds National Rate at All But One

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By: James Pitt  Jun. 27, 2018

Hyponatremia, i.e. low blood sodium, is a common electrolyte imbalance. According to the Mayo Clinic, risk factors for hyponatremia include age, certain medications, kidney disease and heart failure (due to their effects on water excretion), and intensive physical activities like marathons.

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Hyponatremia’s Separate Effects on ICU Admissions and Length of Stay May Present Opportunity to Reduce Length of Stay Among Heart Failure Patients in Maryland

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By: James Pitt  May. 14, 2018

Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte disorder, defined as blood sodium levels under 135 mEq/L. Dexur has previously examined hyponatremia’s effect on ICU stays among patients with heart failure with major comorbidities (DRG 291) in Maryland.

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Hyponatremia Has Unusually Strong Role in DRG 291 Mortality at Johns Hopkins and Anne Arundel Hospitals

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By: James Pitt  May. 10, 2018

Hyponatremia, a low concentration of sodium in the blood, is a common and important electrolyte imbalance. Causes of hyponatremia include heart failure - and it is particularly common in heart failure patients.

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Odds Ratio of ICU Stay With Hyponatremia Range From 0.86 to 2.44 in Maryland DRG 291 (Heart Failure & Shock) Patients

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By: James Pitt  May. 08, 2018

Hyponatremia is an unusually low level of sodium in the blood. Normal sodium levels are 135 to 145 mEq/L. A 2015 review in Journal of Intensive Care Medicine found that hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized patients, frequently encountered in intensive care units (ICUs).

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Samsca May be Particularly Beneficial for Heart Failure Patients Readmitted with Hyponatremia

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By: Saparja Nag  Apr. 19, 2018

Samsca was developed by Otsuka Pharmaceutical to treat hyponatremia as a selective vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist. It is only suitable for cases of euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia; an explanation of the condition can be found in a previous article. Hyponatremia can be caused by a number of conditions including Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone (SIADH) and heart failure. The specific relationship between hyponatremia and heart failure has been studied extensively. Hyponatremia patients with heart failure often present with an increased circulating neurohormones such as angiotensin II, renin, catecholamines, and vasopressin. When a patient has heart failure, their cardiac output and circulating blood volume decrease causing the body to compensate in order to preserve blood pressure, thus increasing water and sodium retention.

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Samsca’s Potential in Affecting LOS for Gastrointestinal and Colorectal Patients with Hyponatremia based on Southwest General Health Center Data

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By: Saparja Nag  Mar. 30, 2018

Samsca by Otsuka Pharmaceuticals is a new therapeutic medicine to treat patients with hyponatremia, which is a condition characterized by decreased serum sodium levels relative to the total body water of the patient. Samsca is only intended to be used for cases of hypervolemic and euvolemic hyponatremia. Hypervolemic hyponatremia refers to patients who experience an increase in total body water relative to sodium levels, whereas euvolemic hyponatremic patients maintain roughly the same total body water with decreased sodium levels. Samsca targets two main populations - heart failure patients and patients with SIADH (Syndrome of Inappropriate Secretion of Antidiuretic Hormone). Heart failure patients fall under hypervolemia when edema is present whereas SIADH patients do not experience edema and are categorized as euvolemia. One study found that patients with mild congestion who were given chronic diuretic therapy tolvaptan, the active ingredient in Samsca, saw normalized serum Na+ concentrations for hyponatremic patients and decreased edema.

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